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Feeding

The “average” adult GSD eats 3-4 cups of food per day. Your dog may eat more or less. It is very important not to let your GSD get overweight. One way to tell if your dog is overweight is by physically examining them. You should not be able to see the ribs, but can feel them with slight finger tip pressure. GSD should also have a “waist” (going in a bit right behind the rib cage) and not form a solid line from their ribs to hips. A good habit to get in to is to weigh your dog each month so you will know if they are gaining or losing weight.

We highly recommend feeding two – three meals per day. Divide the fully recommended daily amount in to the number of meals you plan to feed your dog. Avoid grocery store brand foods and buy the highest quality of food you can afford. The cost of food in relation to price is a reality. You pay for what you get and it can really make a difference in the overall health of your dog.

Never feed a large amount of food as it may lead to intestinal blockage when the food swells in the intestine and can cause the stomach to twist (Bloat.) Divide the fully recommended daily amount in to two or three feedings per day. You may mix water with the food if you choose. We recommend Natural Choice - Large Breed OR Natural Choice Large Breed Lamb & Rice (for those dogs that are allergic to chicken and wheat) and Professional Breeders Formula food ($25-30 for 40lbs.) Avoid cheap grocery store food. Buy the highest quality of food you can afford. The higher the quality of the food, the healthier your dog will be (and LESS stools to pick up!) The cost of food in relation to price is a reality. You pay for what you get and it can really make a difference in the overall health of your dog. Once you settle on a food, don't change it drastically. . If you have to change your dog’s food, begin by mixing 1/2 per day, per feeding of the new food (taking always the same amount of the old.)

Transitioning Your Dog to a New Food

Changing your dog’s food drastically can cause them to have an upset stomach. If you have to change your dog's food, begin by mixing 1/2 per day, per feeding of the new food (taking always the same amount of the old.) Most vets will recommend feeding the lower amount of suggested servings that is provided on the feed instructions on the bag. If you are interested in feeding your dog a raw or cooked diet, there are several good resources on the Internet that can provide you with information

There is a world of information out there on this subject, with opinions going from the extreme “raw meat and bones only, no veggies, no supplements” to “raw with supplements and various veggies” to about 400 different dog kibbles.

I don’t personally do raw. Too much risk since it’s not, in my opinion after extensive research, been scientifically tested enough. My big issue isn’t with the idea of it being raw meat, but rather with the idea of how well we average joe dog owners could ensure that our dogs get the appropriate amounts/ratios of trace elements/minerals/what-have-you. I am sure there are some awesome cooked dog diets out there that have been put together by people who have researched all those requirements. Problem is, I barely cook for ME…and sure don’t trust that I am feeding ME properly. So cooking for my dog? On occasion.

So, it’s kibble for my dogs. I prefer to feed a high quality kibble. There are web sites all over that help you find info on what makes one high quality.The Dog Food Projecthas updates on dog food recalls and dog food companies.

Resources for Information on Bloat

This information is not intended to replace advice or guidance from veterinarians or other pet care professionals. It is simply being shared as an aid to assist you with your own research on this very serious problem.

Bloat

Bloat in Dogs

HomeVet on Bloat

Purdue University Study on Bloat

Response to Purdue Study

 

 

 

Last Update : 03/06/2016
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